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Pacific Northwest

Kingfisher Perches

For better and for worse, humans can have a huge impact on the lives of birds. One positive impact for Belted Kingfishers is that some road building and digging of gravel pits has created banks where the birds can nest and thus allowed the expansion of their breeding range.* But increased... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  environmental champion

Rough-legged Hawk takes off

After breeding on Arctic cliffs and tundra hillsides in summer months, Rough-legged Hawks winter all across the Northern Hemisphere. Open country is their ideal territory, where the small rodents they depend on are plentiful. Frequent photo contributor, Gregg Thompson, was fortunate to spot this... read more »

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Adam's Wild Goose Chase

BirdNote board member Adam Sedgley traveled from Seattle to the Oregon Coast in search of a Tundra Bean-Goose, a rare bird in North America. The goose had been observed near Nestucca Bay National Wildlife Refuge among a flock of native Canada Geese. The Tundra Bean-Goose would be a “life bird”... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  birding

Why I Fish

BirdNote writer and editor Todd Peterson recounts memories of wild places where he enjoyed fishing with his father, including the St. Joe River in the Bitterroot Mountains of northern Idaho and the Elk River near British Columbia’s wild border with Alberta. The call of a loon is among the sounds... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  reflection

Biking Thousands of Miles ... for Birds

11,500That's how many miles Dorian Anderson had biked when I met him on the coast of Washington State in late August. He'd averaged nearly 50 miles a day since he started from his home state of Massachusetts on the morning of January 1. The weather on his first day was freezing with a stiff wind ... read more »

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Duck Stamps: Not Just for Hunters

In the mid-1980s, my mother became one of the first employees of the Seattle Audubon Society. I was about six years old at the time, and I consequently spent the most impressionable years of my childhood around people who loved birds. They loved birds so much that they volunteered their time not... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  birdwatching, environmental champion

Traveling over 1,500 miles to experience "One Square Inch"

A BirdNote listener in Texas heard the story about Gordon Hempton’s One Square Inch of Silence, located in the Hoh Rain Forest in Olympic National Park. Known as the quietest place in the United States, the site is emblematic of the need to protect natural wilderness areas from human noise. She... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  reflection

"You Need a Mister!"

Ken Jacobsen is a retired senator in Washington State who’s a keen birder. When he was on the campaign trail, Jacobsen often advised constituents on ways they could improve conditions for birds in their yards and neighborhoods. You won’t believe what happened when he encouraged one constituent to... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  humor

Inside the burrow of a Rhinoceros Auklet

Everyone knows puffins. Who could forget their comical behavior — with an appearance to match? But you may not know about the Rhinoceros Auklet, a close relative to puffins, found in the Pacific Ocean. Its gray plumage is duller than that of puffins, but during the breeding season it sports a... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  nesting, science

Nesting Red-breasted Sapsuckers

Photographer Gregg Thompson spent several days watching the nest cavity of a pair of Red-breasted Sapsuckers, a species of woodpecker found in far western North America. Cavities are generally excavated in dead trees or dead portions of live trees. Pairs may return to nest in the same area — or... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  nesting, photography

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