Support
Subscribe
Subscribe to BirdNote

Sign up to receive a weekly email preview of the following week's shows!

Sign Up
Support BirdNote

Help BirdNote tell more stories, reach more people, and inspire action.

DONATE

Pacific Northwest

Monitoring Migrating Shorebirds - With Sarah Schmidt

Right now, volunteer observers are counting shorebirds on the move. Sandpipers, dowitchers, plovers, Dunlin, and others that raised their young in the Arctic are now making southbound migrations. They're looking for places to feed and rest along the way. On Crockett Lake in Washington State,... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  citizen science

Condors in the Pacific Northwest

In 1805, members of the Lewis and Clark expedition, while exploring north of the Columbia River, came upon a California Condor. David Douglas, the English naturalist, collecting the flora and fauna of the Columbia River country in the mid-1820s, found the great birds abundant along the lower... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  history

Canyon Spectacle - Swakane Canyon

Canyons, whether large or small, can host a spectacular variety of birds! Consider Swakane Canyon, in central Washington State. It cuts west from the Columbia River into the Entiat Mountains for nine miles, while gaining nearly 3,000 feet. Steep slopes wall in the canyon floor, several hundred... read more »

RELATED

A Series of Encounters

It's rather amusing to think about the summer solstice in the Pacific Northwest. Here in Seattle, we don't consider it summer until after the Fourth of July. Yet many of the breeding birds are done singing by then, having had at least one brood. Many of us have grown up with these strange,... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  reflection

James Swan's Willapa Bay

In 1852, James Swan took up residence in what we now know as Willapa Bay on the southwest coast of Washington State. In his book The Northwest Coast, Swan described the birds he observed on the bay: “white and black swans, white geese, Canada geese, brant, Sheldrake, cormorants, loon, mallard... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  history

White-headed Woodpecker

The White-headed Woodpecker is widely scattered and nowhere common in the Pacific Northwest. Like other woodpeckers, the White-headed Woodpecker digs out juicy insect larvae from the trees by pounding with its sharp bill. But by holding its bill at an angle, the White-headed Woodpecker... read more »

RELATED

Secretive Varied Thrush

Except in winter, when it gathers in loose flocks to move to lower elevations, this shy bird prefers solitude. The intricate pattern of color on its wings resembles dappled sunlight on the forest floor. Naturalist Louis Agassiz Fuertes called the song of the Varied Thrush, "... as perfectly the... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  ecology, species account

Myth of the Thunderbird

Legend tells of a huge bird called the Thunderbird. Its origin remains a mystery, even to Native Americans. According to myth, Thunderbird was so large and flew so high, it carried the rain on its back and created thunder and lightning. Perhaps Teratornis merriami was the creature that inspired... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  fossil, myth

A Baker and Farmer Help Sharp-tailed Grouse

A determined dry-land wheat farmer and a visionary baker are trying to help a bird in trouble, the Sharp-tailed Grouse. The farmer, Wade Troutman, leaves 30% of the land he farms in its natural condition. The undisturbed patches of sagebrush habitat provide cover and food for grouse and their... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  environmental champion

Wade Troutman and the Sharp-tailed Grouse

Eastern Washington wheat farmer, Wade Troutman (left), actively manages his farm to protect habitat for the Sharp-tailed Grouse. Jeff Weissman (right) buys Wade's wheat for his bakery in Seattle. Learn more about IRIS, Initiative for Rural Innovation and Stewardship. Gathering Our Voice helps... read more »

RELATED
Topics & Themes:  environmental champion

Pages

Home
Shows
Galleries
More