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Summer

We sent our reporter out to find a rare species... the teen birder

Elisa Yang loves birds, and she won’t take no for an answer.By Shahla FarzanToday we’re taking you back to high school, to meet some teenage birders. They’re a species rarely seen in the wild. It’s kind of hard to be a teen birder. You’re most likely the only one in your school. And if you... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  birding, birdwatching

The Kids Are Growin' Up

Summertime — and this year's baby birds are growing up. Mike Hamilton's camera has found themunfurling new feathers, practicing essential skills, and sometimes . . . looking a little confused by it all.[We've named the birds below their pictures, so you can guess what they are. Have fun!]This... read more »

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Forest Fires, Recovery, and Birds

Forest fires have profound effects on birds and other wildlife — for better or worse. Birds such as this Black-backed Woodpecker find a bonanza of insects under burned bark and ample snags in which to carve out nest holes. Woodpecker cavities are often reused by birds like bluebirds. And birds... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  ecology

Birds at Mid-summer

What's Going On with the Birds?We often call the solstice "Midsummer," but it's actually only the beginning. August 1st is – strictly speaking – Midsummer. So what's going on in the bird world now? Like the week in Lake Wobegon, it's been mostly quiet. For the most part, the birds have stopped... read more »

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How Birds Stay Cool

On a hot summer’s day, watch a bird such as a crow — or this Purple Martin — very carefully. You’ll never see them sweat, because birds don’t have sweat glands. So how do they keep cool? One way is panting. As the bird breathes rapidly, heat is carried out of its body through the lungs and air... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  science

February Summer in Argentina

In February, winter still holds sway over much of North America. But in Argentina, it’s summer, and birds are in full voice. Argentina’s national bird, the Rufous Hornero, belts out a rapid trill while the Rufous-bellied Thrush sings its lovely song. In the tropical forests of northeastern... read more »

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Why I Fish

BirdNote writer and editor Todd Peterson recounts memories of wild places where he enjoyed fishing with his father, including the St. Joe River in the Bitterroot Mountains of northern Idaho and the Elk River near British Columbia’s wild border with Alberta. The call of a loon is among the sounds... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  reflection

Catchin' Some Rays

EEKS! What's the matter with that bird, flopped on the ground. Is it sick or injured or something?Well, it's the last week of summer vacation, and most of us want to be outdoors, catching one last bit of sun. These birds are takin' in some rays, too. Yes, American Robins are among the top... read more »

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Night Voices of Summer

At the close of a summer day, the songbirds go silent. As if on cue, the birds of the night make their voices known. In an Eastern woodland, the eerie trills and whinnies of an Eastern Screech-Owl are among the first sounds of the night. Meanwhile, as night falls west of the Rockies, the Western... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  birdwatching by ear, sound, vocalization

Counting North America's Waterfowl

In autumn, millions of North American waterfowl – like these Redheads – migrate south. They come from Alaska, the prairies and forests of Canada, the Pothole region of the Dakotas, and Eastern Montana. Their arrival is awaited by birders and hunters alike. Because waterfowl are a vital natural... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  migration, nesting, science

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