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Recording Cerulean Warblers with Charlotte Goedsche

Looking for clues to reverse the decline

Since 1998, Charlotte Goedsche has been studying the Cerulean Warblers that breed in the mountains near Asheville, North Carolina. And she has learned some fascinating things! For example, Charlotte can identify individual Cerulean Warbler males like this one, by listening to their songs. She hopes that her findings will help explain why the number of Cerulean Warblers has declined by 70% during the past 50 years. “The fact that they are declining dramatically makes it even more important to understand their habitat requirements,” Charlotte explains.

Full Transcript

Transcript: 

BirdNote®

Recording Cerulean Warblers

With Charlotte Goedsche

Written by Todd Peterson

This is BirdNote.
[Song of Cerulean Warbler 168301]
For 20 years, Charlotte Goedsche [GET-cha] studied the Cerulean Warblers that breed in the mountains near Asheville,* North Carolina. Sadly, over the past 50 years, their numbers have declined by more than 70%. To understand why, Charlotte began recording the singing of breeding males.
[Song of Cerulean Warbler 85100]
“ it’s absolutely fascinating because I can distinguish almost always the different males and can even tell when I have a bird up there who has returned from the previous year! [Song of Cerulean Warbler 85100] And the fact that they are declining dramatically makes it even more important to understand their habitat requirements.”
Charlotte provides her findings to the National Park Service and to Audubon North Carolina.
“I think people all over the United States can get more active in conserving birds of all kinds by working with their Audubon Societies.”  
[Song of Cerulean Warbler 73974]
To find your local Audubon, visit Audubon.org/chapters. BirdNote celebrates the efforts of our listeners — and the work of our partners, such as Audubon — to conserve birds and the environment we share.
For BirdNote, I’m Michael Stein.
###
Bird sounds provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Song of Cerulean Warbler [168301] recorded by W.L. Hershberger; song of Cerulean Warbler [85100] recorded by W.L. Hershberger; and song of Cerulean Warbler [73974] recorded by G.A. Keller.
Marantz V Tracks 383 & 400
BirdNote’s theme music was composed and played by Nancy Rumbel and John Kessler.
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Sallie Bodie
Associate Producer: Ellen Blackstone
Assistant Producer: Mark Bramhill
© 2005-2020 Tune In to Nature.org    January 2014/2020   Narrator: Michael Stein

ID# CERW-01-2014-01-16             CERW-01b  

http://ncaudubonblog.org/2012/04/cerulean-warblers-return-to-bull-creek-...
Cerulean Warbler Atlas Project http://www.birds.cornell.edu/cewap/
Blue Ridge Parkway http://www.blueridgeparkway.org/
Audubon North Carolina http://nc.audubon.org/
Elisha Mitchell Audubon Society http://emasnc.org/

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