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Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)

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Birds and Baseball

At the crack of the bat, a Blue Jay flies toward first and glides around the base. Deep in left field, an Oriole pounces on the ball. He wings the ball toward second, where a fellow Oriole snares it on a hop - just as the swift Blue Jay slides toward the base in a cloud of red dust. Ahh, summer... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  sports

John Burroughs II

John Burroughs, one of the masters of American nature writing, wrote "The birds do indeed begin with the day. The farmer who is in the field at work while he can yet see stars catches their first matin hymns. In the longest June days the robin strikes up about half past three o'clock..."... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  vocalization

The Female Oriole Weaves a Nest

Not only are most orioles eye-catching, but they also rank among the world's most accomplished nest-builders. Female orioles — like the Baltimore Oriole seen here — weave nests that hang like pendants. You can spot these hanging nests most easily when the trees have lost their leaves. The female... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  nesting

The Baltimore Oriole

Not all blackbirds are mostly black. This Baltimore Oriole is orange! It’s named after Sir George Calvert, First Lord of Baltimore, whose coat-of-arms carried a gold and black design. In spring and summer, you may see these orioles in the Midwest and eastern US, lighting up the trees where they... read more »

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Topics & Themes:  birdfeeding, nesting, plumage
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