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Red-crowned Cranes Dance on Hokkaido

Amazing courtship displays - in the snow

On a snow-covered field in northern Japan, two majestic Red-crowned Cranes face one another, raise their heads toward the sky, and call in unison. As they call, the pair begins to dance. They bow to one another, then throw their heads over their backs, then bow again. The pair leaps into the air, at the same time raising their wings. The Red-crowned Cranes' unison dance is a ritual the pair will perform together many times over the years, to strengthen their lifelong bond. In Japanese tradition, the beloved crane is said to live 1,000 years and symbolizes longevity. "Fold a thousand cranes and the gods will fulfill your heart's desire." 

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Transcript: 

BirdNote®  

Red-crowned Cranes Dance on Hokkaido
Written by Bob Sundstrom

This is BirdNote.[Red-crowned Crane pair unison calls]

On a snow-covered field in northern Japan, two majestic Red-crowned Cranes face one another, raise their heads toward the sky, and call in unison. [Red-crowned Crane pair unison calls]

The slender cranes stand more than five feet tall. Their white bodies glisten like the snow. Their long, slim necks are mostly black. Their heads are topped by crimson crowns. Their bills are yellow spears.

As they call [Red-crowned Crane pair unison calls], the pair begins to dance. They bow to one another, then throw their heads over their backs, then bow again. The pair leaps into the air, at the same time raising their wings, flashing a bold banner of black. They prance, stiff-legged, then leap with wings aloft, again and again, like two immense butterflies fluttering above the snow. [Red-crowned Crane pair unison calls] 

The Red-crowned Cranes’ unison dance is a ritual the pair will perform together many times over the years, to strengthen their lifelong bond. 

In Japanese tradition, the beloved crane is said to live 1,000 years and symbolizes longevity. The bird is celebrated in a remarkable feat of origami craft in which 1,000 paper cranes are cut and folded. As the tradition says: “Fold a thousand cranes and the gods will fulfill your heart’s desire.” [Red-crowned Crane pair unison calls] 

There's a beautiful video of the cranes, dancing, on our website, BirdNote.org. I'm Michael Stein.

 ###

Calls of Red-crowned Cranes recorded by David Farrow XC49791 accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/49791.
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Chris Peterson
© 2015 Tune In to Nature.org   February 2015  Narrator: Michael Stein

 ID#     RECRCR-01-2013-02-14 RECRCR-01

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