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Dark-eyed Junco Pair

Which is it? "Slate-colored" or "Oregon"?

A female Dark-eyed Junco lands on a branch nearby, where you can admire her subtle beauty. The muted colors of her feathers. Her nearly weightless buoyancy. Her quick, bright eyes. Her tidy pink bill. Often in winter, you may see a "Slate-colored" Junco or an "Oregon" Junco. In spring, this little snowbird and her mate will probably head north or into higher elevations, to begin a new breeding cycle.

Full Transcript

Transcript: 
BirdNote®
Dark-eyed Junco Pair - The Desire of Life for Itself

Written by Todd Peterson

This is BirdNote!
[From Mozart Sonata #11 in A Major]
On a blustery day near the end of winter, I stand high on a ladder pruning an old hazelnut tree. As I stop to rest, a female Dark-eyed Junco lands on the branch before me, nearly close enough to touch. Her mate alights nearby.
[Junco song]
I breathe quietly and do not move. They know I am here but are not afraid.
I admire her subtle beauty. The muted colors of her feathers. Her nearly weightless buoyancy. Her quick, bright eyes. She cleans her small bill on the grey-green lichen of the branch.
[Song of Junco]
A squall blows in, filling the air with sound and gray light. The overarching branches of a big cedar shelter us from the rain. But a single small drop lands on the crown of her head. It glistens like a jewel.
Her attentive mate watches close by.
I want to believe that she is even more beautiful to him than she is to me. In them together, I sense the generative energy flowing through the world. I come again to know that the sacred is the desire of life for itself.
For BirdNote, I’m Mary McCann.
                                                                               ###
Song of Dark-eyed Junco provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Song recorded by G.A.Keller
Musical  selection from Sonata #11 in A Major by Mozart pianist Maria-Joaopires
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Chris Peterson
© 2011 Tune In to Nature.org          May 2011     Narrator: Mary McCann

ID# DEJU-04-2011-05-10     


 

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